Jan Toorop

Dutch, 1858 - 1928

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17 pictures

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Aggressivity of Sleep  by Jan Toorop
Aggressivity of Sleep
Christus Eucharisticus  by Jan Toorop
Christus Eucharisticus
Desire and Fulfillment  by Jan Toorop
Desire and Fulfillment
Fatalism  by Jan Toorop
Fatalism
Le Passeur d'eau  by Jan Toorop
Le Passeur d'eau
Les Calvinistes de Catwijck  by Jan Toorop
Les Calvinistes de Catwijck
Lily Clifford  by Jan Toorop
Lily Clifford
Nirvana  by Jan Toorop
Nirvana
O Grave, Where is Thy Victory?  by Jan Toorop
O Grave, Where is Thy Victory?
Rise, with opposition, of modern art  by Jan Toorop
Rise, with opposition, of modern art
The Seduction  by Jan Toorop
The Seduction
The Sphinx  by Jan Toorop
The Sphinx
The Three Brides  by Jan Toorop
The Three Brides
The three girls Volker van Waverveen  by Jan Toorop
The three girls Volker van Waverveen
The Valley of the Roses  by Jan Toorop
The Valley of the Roses
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BIOGRAPHY

Dutch painter, born in Java. Studied art in Delft and Amsterdam. A grant allowed him to study in Brussels, where he came into contact with the XX group, and became a member in 1885. He befriended Khnopff, Ensor and de Groux. In 1886, he met Whistler in London. He discovered the Pre-Raphaelites and William Morris' views on art and socialism. In 1890 he developed his own version of Symbolism using elements of a Javanese aesthetic. Met Péladan in 1892. In 1905 converted to Catholicism. His themes thereafter became religious and even mystic. His style simplified and he adopted a technique close to Pointillisme, which he put at the service of a fragmentation of the surface of the painting at poles from the measured unity to which Seurat aspired. These fragmentary surfaces relate Toorop to Expressionism.

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Symbolist Paintings: 24 Cards
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Symbolism
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Symbolism
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The Desire and the Satisfaction, Jan Toorop
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